Thursday, December 29, 2005

LMS Comic

I've been meaning to draw up this comic idea about higher education and a learning management system (LMS) for a while now, but you know how some things go, they just sit in the to-do pile for too long.

Well, this new Flickr craze I'm having motivated me to finish the strip and load it up. Here it is.

I'd never noticed before, but was pretty disappointed to find that free Flickr accounts only allow 3 sets to be made! So I added this latest comic to the OpenCourseware set.

update: James bought me a pro flickr account for the year! What a legend. Now I can create as many sets as I like :)

Creative Commons Licence

This work is licensed under a Creative Commons (Attribution) license.



7 comments:

Graham Wegner said...

Leigh, the comic was great. The LMS had almost a Ned Kelly-esque quality and we know how well that helmet of his protected him in the end.

Leigh Blackall said...

ah yes! nice correlation G. Another comic in the wind there..

Adski said...

Leigh, a way to get around the 3 set limitation is to use a unique tag for the comic. Because of the way Flickr works, you can link to that tag.

There are some bummers about this method, namely you can't comment on a tag like you can on a set, and reordering the slides is a pain in the ass. But it's a hack that may work in some situations!

Leigh Blackall said...

yep. that's clearly a better way than combining with another set. Aside from not have comments enabled, there is also the bummer of not getting a set on your flickr homepage :(

Perhaps sets need to be kept dynamic and up to date, with old stuff retiring to the tag method...?

Leigh Blackall said...

actually mate, it doesn't work :( for some reason the tag way has dropped them all out of order, even though I was careful to upload them in order last to first...

Jeremy Price said...

I really enjoyed your comic. It's nicely done. I'm a big fan of the comics medium as it is, and I always find it fascinating to see how different people incorporate the medium into the field of education. I was also wondering if you could point me in the direction of where you found the 70% reduction of reading comprehension on a computer screen you mentioned in panel 009? Thanks, and keep up the good work!

Leigh Blackall said...

Ah! was bound to be asked for that reference...

I picked it up from a presentation I saw (and recorded) in Johannesburg South Africa a couple of years ago. I've been meaning to rewatch the recording to a. get the name of the presenter, and b. double check her reference to the stat.

I seem to recall her referencing Jacob Nielson - if you find it let me know...

I'd better dig that tape out and see what I can find. 70% does seem high, but it screen resolution and eye strain would have to having an affect on comprehension rates..